Kind Of A Giant

Tyler posts stupid stuff online

Aquaman #34 Review: Land and Sea

My newest review is up at InfiniteComix.com! This week is Aquaman #34. The “Futures End” tie-in issue for Aquaman comes out on Wednesday this week, so look for my next review later in the week.

Even if you don’t like Aquaman (which you should but I won’t get into that here) then I’d still like to recommend you click around on InfiniteComix.com because we cover all kinds of books from DC, Marvel, Image, Boom! and lots of other publishers. And it’s not just reviews either; there’s movie/tv news, *con coverage, and lots of stuff.

Montana, 1909.

Montana, 1909.

Brb, joining a new political party. #ProSasquatch

Brb, joining a new political party. #ProSasquatch

Happy birthday to Jack Kirby on what would have been his 97th. He created some of the best sci-fi and comic books in existence.

Happy birthday to Jack Kirby on what would have been his 97th. He created some of the best sci-fi and comic books in existence.

(Source: joearlikelikescomics)

I did a public thing with MIT Media Lab in Austin the other month where I talked about how science fiction, incubated inside genre walls for so long, has burst out of its cell to infect everything. Science fiction lives in the mainstream now, in all strata of culture, to the point where we barely even notice any more — it’s just part of the fabric of the modern world. The superhero is part science fiction and part crime story, both of which are forms of social fiction. It’s been said, a lot, that the superhero is ad hoc mythmaking for the contemporary era. And a fraught and culture-shocked society needs and demands rescue stories. Look at how both UFO sightings and angel sightings peaked in the run-up to the millennium: a wish to seek and solve the mystery of the Other that might swoop down from the sky to save us.

—Warren Ellis.

(Source: imagecomics, via mattfractionblog)

The Ramones in Liverpool, England in May 1977. Photo by Ian Dickson.

The Ramones in Liverpool, England in May 1977. Photo by Ian Dickson.

Joe Flaherty and John Candy throwing televisions off a balcony.

Joe Flaherty and John Candy throwing televisions off a balcony.

Behold! The scale of our galaxy. As Bill Nye’s intro theme song says, “Science rules.”

Behold! The scale of our galaxy. As Bill Nye’s intro theme song says, “Science rules.”